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Glover's Reef, Belize
Glover's Reef is a partially submerged atoll located off the southern coast of Belize, approximately 45 kilometres from the mainland. It forms part of the outermost boundary of the Belize Barrier Reef and is one of the greatest diversity of reef types in the western Caribbean.

The oval-shaped atoll is 32 km long and 12 km wide. The interior lagoon is dotted with around 850 reef patches and pinnacles rising to the surface. Major cays within Glover's Reef include Amounme Point Cay, Northeast Cay, Long Cay, Middle Cay and Southwest Cay.

The Glover's Reef Marine Reserve was established as a national protected area in 1993 and in 2002, it was declared a special marine reserve and has been permanently closed to fishing. It is considered one of the highest priority areas in the Mesoamerican reef system, providing nursery and feeding areas and a unique habitat for lobster, conch and finfish. In 1996, it was designated by UNESCO as one of seven protected areas that together form the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System. In particular, Glover's Reef is a large spawning site for the endangered Nassau grouper fish which is located at the northeastern end of the atoll. It has been identified as one of only two viable sites remaining for the species, of nine originally known locations worldwide.

Most cruises to this region sail in the Northern winter months from October to April.

The Caribbean region is tropical and days are hot, with nights much cooler; temperatures range from 32 °C (90 °F) during the daytime to 21 °C (70 °F) in the evening practically year-round. Humidity is always high at about 80 percent. The rainy season takes place between October and November, and the best months to visit are mid-December and late March

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