Port
Calf of Man, England
The Calf of Man is a 250-hectare island lying off the southwestern tip of the Isle of Man. It is separated by a narrow strait of water known as the Calf Sound.The Norsemen called it kalfr, meaning a small island near to a large one. In Manx it is Yn Cholloo. Encircled by precipitous cliffs, the Calf is isolated from the main Island by a swirling tidal race.

Once a refuge for Christian monks and hermits, the Calf was farmed intermittently for several centuries, the principal livestock being sheep. During the 18th and 19th centuries there were several hundred animals together with five or six families, latterly including lighthouse keepers, resident on the Calf. Now it is a bird observatory and nature reserve.

The waters around the Calf are a paradise for SCUBA diving from boats by those who are suitably experienced. For those who do not dive, a boat excursion will reward them with a wealth of birdlife and probably a chance to watch the seals as they sunbathe on the rocks and to catch a glimpse of basking sharks which enjoy legal protection in Manx waters.

Things to see and do

* Lighthouses
* Jane’s House
* Calf Crucifixion Stone
* Birdlife

General information

Cruise Season – March to Nov
Currency – British pound (GBP)
Language – English & Manx Gaelic
Land Area – 2.6 sq km’s
Population – 2
Electricity – 2 round pins European style or 2 vertical square pins and one perpendicular below British style
Time –GMT plus zero hours
International Country Telephone Code – + 44-1624

Port Location – The port for cruiseships is located at Douglas on the Isle of Man.

Transport Links –There are regular flights available to the Isle of Man from a wide spread of regional airports across the UK and Ireland, while ferry and SeaCat crossings operate from Liverpool and Heysham. It is possible to reach the Calf of Man by boat from both Port Erin and Port St Mary in the south of the Isle of Man.
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