Cruise
Balmoral
Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines
Balmoral, Spain Portugal & Madeira ex Southampton Return
Ship: Balmoral
Selected Sailing Date: 22 Mar 2019
Available Sailing Dates

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$1,749.24
$2,274.54
$3,675.34
$3,850.44
Prices displayed are retail per person, twin share, to the Australian Travel Trade. Consumers please contact your local cruise agent to request this Cruise Abroad package. At time of booking please check current cruise fare and any inclusions. Prices are indicative only, subject to currency fluctuations and may change at any time without notice.

Itinerary
Cruise Itinerary
Itinerary may vary by sailing date and itineraries may be changed at the cruise lines discretion. Please check itinerary details at time of booking and before booking other travel services such as airline tickets.
Cruise Description

11 Night Cruise sailing from Southampton roundtrip aboard Balmoral.

Experience Madeira’s enchanting beauty on this shorter-than-usual escape to this fabulously floral island. Although your holiday will be less than two weeks in length, you’ll still enjoy an overnight stay in Funchal to discover fragrant gardens, majestic natural wonders and more. Plus, there’s stops at charming mainland cities for a wealth of diverse attractions too.

Four wonderfully rewarding destinations feature on this 11-night sailing in total, so your cruise promises a plethora of memorable sights and experiences. In Spain, La Coruña makes for a fantastic first stop on your itinerary. Head ashore and explore this Galician gem and you’ll be presented with an array of architecture and famous landmarks; be sure to take in the pretty facades of Maria Pita Square and the ancient Torre de Hercules. La Coruña is also your gateway to the incredible, UNESCO-listed Santiago de Compostela cathedral. Continuing south, Balmoral diverts to Leixoes to offer you your first chance to step foot on Portuguese shores. From here, you can take a short trip to Oporto, to uncover pretty pastel-fronted houses, fine examples of neo-classic and baroque architecture, and a number of world-famous port wine cellars in Portugal’s enchanting second city.

Stopping overnight in Madeira will be an undoubted highlight of your holiday. Your ship will dock at Funchal, the Madeiran capital, from where you could go in search of botanical gardens such as the Monte Palace Tropical Garden, to immerse yourself in a feast of vibrant colours and sweet floral scents. The unique levada walking trails, which showcase some of Madeira’s most beautiful landscapes, are yours to explore in the seasonal sunshine too; while you also have a chance to visit the remarkable Cabo Girão – the world’s second highest sea cliff – for unspoilt Atlantic Ocean views. Whatever you choose to do, your time on the ‘Garden Island’ is sure to be unforgettable. Finally, it’s back to the Portuguese mainland to visit Lisbon, a charming capital city packed with fascinating museums, adorable historic districts and impressive, centuries-old monuments such as the Belém Tower and Jerónimos Monastery. See the sights on foot, via the tram, or even take a ride on a Tuk Tuk for a unique experience. However you choose to explore, be sure to visit Pasteis de Belém to sample one of the world-famous egg pastries.

Highlights of this cruise:

La Coruña, Spain
The city of La Coruña is the capital of the province and a busy seaport situated in the Galicia region of northwest Spain. Most famous for its Roman lighthouse, the diverse architectural styles of La Coruña make the city an absolute delight for sightseeing.

La Coruña boasts an impressive seafront promenade, beautiful beaches and a host of attractions such as the Domus Museum, the Casa del Hombre and Torre De Hercules – said to be the only Roman lighthouse in existence – which offers sweeping coastal views from the top of its 60 metre high tower. The Paseo Marítimo, a lovely 13km walkway and bike path, runs from the port, around the peninsula, and along the ocean beaches.

The compact Ciudad Vieja – La Coruña’s old quarter – is a must-visit area. Often referred to as “the city” by the locals, the medieval centre contains remains of the centuries-old Roman wall that once protected it. The arcaded Plaza de María Pita, surrounded by narrow pedestrianized lanes, is a popular spot, and features the Estatua de María Pita, a statue of a 16th century woman who warned the town of an invasion by Sir Francis Drake. The medieval Church of Santiago, the Museum of Sacred Art and the Military Museum are all fine places of interest.

Beyond the historic city is a proud, modern metropolis, which boasts a superb food scene and a buzzing nightlife. The world’s best picnic food, empanadas, and the locally produced beer, Estrella, both demand trying.

Funchal, Portugal
Funchal, the capital of Portugal's Madeiran archipelago, has a timeless old-world charm. Enhanced by a subtropical climate that fills this 'floating garden' with the year-round colours and perfumes of flowers and fruit, Funchal was a favourite of Sir Winston Churchill. His praise of the city has ensured British visitors always receive a warm welcome from locals.

Backed by rolling hills, the town is famous for its harbour, the 17th century São Tiago Fortress (now the Contemporary Art Museum) and world renowned Madeiran wine cellars. Funchal’s parks and gardens are a delight, and a hike through the Laurel Forest nearby is highly recommended. The ancient Funchal Cathedral mixes Gothic and Romanesque architecture, and is noted for its impressive carved wooden ceiling.

Lisbon, Portugal
Stretched across its seven trademark hills overlooking the River Tagus estuary, Portugal’s hilly, coastal capital city of Lisbon, is a cinematic collection of cobbled alleyways, pastel-coloured buildings, ancient ruins and white-domed cathedrals. Decimated by an earthquake in 1755, modern Lisbon has been shaped by that eventful day. The Pombaline architecture that now defines the city represents some of the first seismically-protected buildings in Europe.

The city’s bridges include the Ponte 25 de Abril – similar to the Golden Gate in San Francisco – and the Ponte Vasco da Gama, which includes over 11km of viaducts. Lisbon’s many fascinating museums, include the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, the National Museum of Contemporary Art, the National Coach Museum and the Carmo Archaeological Museum.

Lisbon is also a shopper’s paradise, with the Centro Commercial Colombo – the biggest shopping mall on the Iberian peninsula – and the elegant Avenidas Novas, full of upmarket shops. Alternatively, there bargains to be had in the local flea market, Campo de Santa Clara. Don't miss the chance to sample iconic egg tarts at Pasteis de Belém too.

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