Cruise
Boudicca
Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines
Boudicca, Fjords of Greenland ex Dover Roundtrip
Ship: Boudicca
Selected Sailing Date: 07 Aug 2019
Available Sailing Dates

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$4,086.48
$5,152.98
$7,641.48
$7,996.98
Prices displayed are retail per person, twin share, to the Australian Travel Trade. Consumers please contact your local cruise agent to request this Cruise Abroad package. At time of booking please check current cruise fare and any inclusions. Prices are indicative only, subject to currency fluctuations and may change at any time without notice.

Itinerary
Cruise Itinerary
Itinerary may vary by sailing date and itineraries may be changed at the cruise lines discretion. Please check itinerary details at time of booking and before booking other travel services such as airline tickets.
Cruise Description

16 Night Cruise sailing from Dover roundtrip aboard Boudicca.

Journey off the well-beaten tourist track to unearth the fascinating culture and inspirational scenery of Greenland’s most remote regions on this memorable cruise adventure. Astonishing waterways, remarkable natural wonders and enchanting settlements await amongst these isolated lands, and smaller-sized Boudicca is your guide to uncovering the very best of them.

The four days of Greenlandic exploration featured on this incredible 16-night itinerary are packed with unforgettable experiences. After visiting Iceland for an overnight stay in Reykjavik, gateway to the wonders of the Golden Circle and the Blue Lagoon, scenic cruising of the immaculate Prins Christiansund and Torssukátak Fjord provides the perfect introduction to the scenic splendour of Greenland. Views of soaring mountains, glorious glaciers, imposing icebergs and cascading waterfalls will whet your appetite for what’s to come. Your first chance to step foot on Greenland’s shores comes in Qaqortoq, where you could visit the interesting museum and intriguing Stone & Man sculptures, or perhaps experience the Greenlandic tradition of Kaffe-Mik in the company of the town’s friendly locals. Qaqortoq is also ideally located for tours to the Great Lake, which boasts some of the country’s most breathtaking Arctic landscapes.

Then there’s Narsarsuaq, starting point for boat tours to the awe-inspiring Qooroq Ice Fjord. Take the exhilarating ride into Qooroq and you’ll see beautiful blue icebergs, which break away from the magnificent Qooroq Glacier, up-close in all their frozen glory. Alternatively, you might choose to venture up Signal Hill in Narsarsuaq to marvel at the unspoilt scenery of Tunugdlliarfik Fjord, before embarking Boudicca once again to sail Tunugdlliarfik in the evening en route to Nanortalik. Your final call in Greenland offers a fascinating insight into life in region; the Open Air Museum showcases traditional clothing, kayaks and much more, while a live performance of song and dance from the locals is sure to delight. For one last memorable Greenlandic experience, you’ll also enjoy scenic cruising of the majestic Tasermuit Fjord before Boudicca heads back to Dover via Scotland’s rugged Orkney Islands.

Highlights of this cruise:

Reykjavík, Iceland
Reykjavik – Iceland’s stunning coastal capital and cultural centre – is the world’s most northerly capital. The city combines colourful buildings, impulsive, creative people, extraordinary design, and some of the country’s most beautiful natural wonders.

The cosmopolitan city with big heart is home to the Althing – the world’s oldest parliament, and the National and Saga Museums, which trace Iceland’s Viking history. The impressive Hallgrímskirkja Church bell tower and the rotating Perlan glass dome offer panoramic views off island. Reykjavik’s galleries and exhibitions, including the outstanding Reykjavík Art Museum and National Gallery, feature radical Icelandic design, and there are many public art installations.

The capital has benefited from a recent surge in high-quality restaurant openings, offering a broad mix of creative cuisine. Daytime cafés switch to restaurants and bars at night – tapas, concept-dining and burger joints all sit comfortably together. And then there’s the wonderful nightlife.

Located in southwest Iceland – characterised by vast peninsulas, coves, straits and islands – Reykjavik is in easy reach of several must-see geological attractions. The iconic Golden Circle Trail includes the Blue Lagoon Spa, the Thingvellir National Park, the renowned Gullfoss Waterfall, and the incredible Geysir hot springs.

Nauthólsvík Geothermal Beach – Reykjavik’s little bit of paradise – is also unmissable. The popular sandy beach and geothermal lagoon, where cold sea and hot geothermal waters meet to produce higher temperatures, offers hot-tubs, steam baths and various water sports to try.

Qaqortoq, Greenland
Frequently isolated by winter sea ice, the ‘White Palace’, Qaqortoq, is southern Greenland’s largest town. Founded by Norwegian traders in 1775, Qaqortoq still retains some beautiful colonial buildings from that time. The challenging landscape and harsh climate have ensured the preservation of Greenland’s traditional culture, and the many ancient Inuit skills of fishing, hunting and kayaking.

Qaqortoq is very proud of its ancient fountain – for many years the only one in Greenland – which has carvings of whales spouting water out of their blowholes, and the names of all of the town burghers in brass letters around its base. The Stone and Man project is also fascinating, featuring natural rock that’s been carved by local artists into abstract shapes and figures.

The charming Church of Our Saviour, dating from 1832, is found in the town centre, and the two local museums are also worth seeing. The ancient but well preserved Hvalsey Norse ruins are just outside the town. Hvalsey is mentioned in the Icelandic annals, the Flateyjarbók, and has extensive and substantial remains of dwellings dating back over a thousand years.

Nanortalik, Greenland
Nanortalik – Greenland’s most southerly town – is unlike any other town in the country. Sat on a small island at the end of a wonderful fjord and surrounded by vast snow-topped mountains, the ‘Place of Polar Bears’ is truly unique.

The small woodlands and prairies against a spectacular backdrop make this is a nature lover’s paradise. Polar bears live and hunt on the sea ice close to the town and are often seen from the shores of Nanortalik. Seals and whales can also be spotted in the surrounding waters. In the winter months, visitors are often lucky enough to capture the Aurora Borealis – Mother Nature’s own spectacular display, with curtains of white, yellow and green flashes lighting up the sky.

The town has a well preserved historic quarter where there are cafés and an unusual wooden church. Brightly coloured houses line the streets, while the Nanortalik Museum has some fascinating exhibits including the oldest women’s boat ever found, which dates back to 1440 and was found by polar explorer and artist, Eigil Knuth.

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